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been this delay. >> the former president of the united states, bill clinton, take it, has been spending time with the president today at the white house. what do weigh know about this? >> you know, it is interesting because we saw him come here to the white house to have a meeting with the president. we asked about that when we saw him arrive here. we were told that he came and was simply in town. and came here to stop by and meet with the president and also meet with other officials here at the white house. we don't know if he's still here. . beyond that we don't know anything else about that meeting. it does seem interesting the timing of this while this is all taking place, the former president, bill clinton did come by the white house. >> stand by. we will be getting back to you. once again, we are awaiting the president. he's supposed to come out around 4:30 p.m. eastern, 27 minutes or so from now. let's bring in our -- our panel, national security contributor, fran townsend, former homeland security adviser to president bush. also with us, national security analyst peter bergen. s
on the united states, for sure we should have cancelled his visa instead of saying, well, we'll look at his visa again after it's expired. because the results of that was 300 people on the plane almost expired. so this is a very big wake-up call. and the first place we should wake up is to toss out the views of the so-called privacy advocates who have been hangin' around the fringes of this question for the last five years, a body scan with the technology today doesn't invade anybody's privacy. you can't tell whether it's a man or a woman. >> but yet it's these privacy groups, governor, that still make a big deal of it. we're just getting word that the minneapolis airport. more on that. we'll let you know but it's on the heels of this disruption in newark a couple days ago. but what keeps happening here? >> the congress needs to stand up to these folks and say, hey, mandatory patdowns are a bigger invasion of privacy than the body scan. i would hope that the president of the united states tells people today that there will be mandatory body scans on every domestic polite in the united states and
starts now. >>> we're supposed to be seeing new procedures for folks flying to the united states. but are airports following the rules? tonight checking on your security situation. and why your treatment will depend not only on where you're from, but where you've been. but following a green beret as he goes off to war. >> i feel more nervous more for her and the kids. >> tonight one man's mission and the impact on those left behind. and a tremendous accomplishment. teams finally unveil the tallest structure that man has ever created. today a deadly shootout inside a federal building in las vegas. investigators say a man wearing black walked into the lobby of a federal courthouse, pulled out a shotgun from his jacket and opened fire. all of the video from that incident in just a moment. seven u.s. marshalls and security officers later responded with a hail of bullets. one court officer is dead tonight. a deputy u.s. marshal is in the hospital tonight and the gunman was shot and killed. so why did he do it? now we've learned he was upset because he lost a lawsuit. more on the motiv
heading to the united states, something our audience already was well familiar with. >> regarding the report specifically on the christmas incident, we were told by general jones that it would contain shocking information. as it turns out, i couldn't find anything new in there. what do we though about how much of it is still classified? >> reporter: we don't know how much remains classified. we may never know that. what we do know is this process today was delayed twice. the president was originally supposed to talk to us at 1:00 a.m., then 3 p.m ultimately it was 4:30 p.m why? because of a rather intensive debate about what to keep classified and what to declassify. what we do learn is that there was a fundamental break down in this new system of applied and created after 9-11. the c.i.a. and the national counterterrorism center are supposed to deal with each other and deal with each other rapidly and cooperatively. that didn't happen. let me read one key part of the report that talks about this break down. quote, the intentional redundancy in the system should have added an addi
's name was the reason no one realized he had a visa to enter the united states which should have set alarm bells ringing. according to this official, one letter was dropped from mr. abdulmutallab's name when an employee cross-checked his name against a government database. this happened back on november 20th. had mr. abdulmutallab's name been entered correctly, officials apparently would have seen that he was classified as a possible terrorist and then the fact that he also had a visa to enter the united states would have kicked him over into what they call a 3-b classification. a 3-b classification would have kept him from boarding the plane. one letter in his name. the fact that the failures in this case have been narrowed down to that level of detail gives you some idea of how intense the security reviews have been over the last few days. in his remarks today, president obama also vowed to redouble u.s. efforts to defeat al qaeda. >> here at home we will strengthen our defenses, but we will not succumb to a siege mentality that sacrifices the open society and liberties and values
into this al qaeda narrative that says that islam -- the united states is at war with islam. we have to be very careful. it's that narrative that feeds the ranks and builds the ranks of al qaeda. >> reporter: this afternoon, the council on american/islamic relations said the new guidelines amount to racial profiling, though the tsa says the majority of all travelers come to the u.s. will get enhanced screening, not just those from the 14 countries named. wolf? >> do you get the sense this is just the latest step that more are on the way? >> this is definitely an evolutionary process. they want to take some steps immediately. there will be reevaluations, new intelligence that come in, and things will change, i'm sure. >> thank you, jeanne. >>> let's get to the white house where the terror threat is the president's most urgent priority. he's back from vacation. our dan lothian is standing by. dan, the president is getting some high-level briefings today, getting ready for a full-scale meeting with his top advisers tomorrow? >> reporter: he is, wolf. first of all, the president getting an update f
in yemen is an organization that can reach out and touch the united states. that's a major reason general david petraeus went to yemen over the weekend and met with the president there and took messages and we are told pieces of information, and that's a direct quote from a senior u.s. official. pieces of information to president obama. the bottom line they are talking about targeting al qaeda. general petraeus made rare open remarks about yemen over the weekend. >> it's a country that has a lot of challenges. the reduction in oil production, although gas is going up, thankfully. many of the challenges of countries that are in the process of development, rugged terrain, tribal areas and so forth. and so very important, indeed, that yemen has taken the actions that it has, and indeed that not just the united states, but countries in the region, its neighbors and so forth have provided significant assistance. >> what comes next, heidi? yemen has taken actions. there will be more sharing of intelligence and more targeting information, and more training and equipping of yemenen security force
. >>> and united states and great britain closing their embassies in yemen, citing a specific, credible ongoing threat from al qaeda. it's unclear how long the embassies will remain closed. is yemen the new front in the war on terror? we're live in dubai with our security watch this morning. >>> we begin with tough new security measures facing every passenger flying to america from 14 high-risk nations, those nations are considered sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest by the transportation security administration. the new rules take effect this morning. our homeland security correspondent jean mene meserve live. >> reporter: all passengers on flights heading into the united states will be subject to random screening, and those flying in from certain countries will be required to go through enhanced screenings, such as full-body pat-downs, carry on bag searches, full body scanning and explosive detection swabs, this according to a new security directive issued by the transportation security administration, and now in effect. the countries include those that are officially listed by the
it it will get a full patdown before boarding any flight to the united states. laura ingle is live at newark international airport. i was in that airport last night and flying in from the cotton bowl in texas and landed in newark and had no idea what was going on. they took our plane for a couple of hours over to a holding place and when we walked into the airport, laura, you and i travel a lot for business. i have never seen a flood of people in an airport like that in all my born days. it was so cold outside that everybody who needed to be rescreened was let inside and waiting for security. you couldn't move. it was a mess. >>> definitely looked like a night. >> well, i talked so long that we lost our satellite. jinx on you. maybe we will get it right back. the thing with that last night was and we knew it at the time when we landed we went straight to fox news.com and find out, though the pilot didn't know it, fox news.com was telling us that a man had been inside security, many of you probably heard this story but the man was inside the sterile zone and walked outside and came back. peop
are not grounded in prejudice and at the time the republican president of the united states said the senator should go as well. >> shannon: the democrats say there is no way you could probably compare the two situations. here is what robert gibbs said about trying to equate reid's remarks to lotts. >> i would suggest they spend about 20 seconds reading a little history and figuring out that to draw that analogy strains any intellectual enterprise. >> shannon: from the other side of the aisle we have texas senator john cornen who said it is difficult to see the situation as anything other than a clear double standard on the part of senate democrats and others. democrats expressed outrage at senator lott and called on him to step down as leader. the same standard should be applied to senator reid and his embarrassing and racially insensitive statements. >> shepard: shannon, good to see you, thank you. >>> the fort hood incident. before it they questioned his confidence and behavior and questioned his highwayialty to our nation. but military doctors still gave positive evaluations of dr. nadalp.hasan.
of representing the people of connecticut and the united states congress i will not be extended for reelection this november. jane: there you have it. three other democratic senators not seeking reelection including ted kaufman of delaware, will burris, and paul kirk. on the republican side there are six who said they will not run for reelection, and there is a look at those six. democrats could be facing a bit of a battle to keep that filibuster-proof supermajority in the senate. that is the talk of the town today. let's bring in fox news contributor and political analyst juan williams. one of the things that people who love to watch politics like all of us do, figure out how the pieces move around here. what is your take? >> well, i mean, the deal here in washington is that democrats jumping ship. the waters are too turbulent at the moment. it looks like tea party politics, anti-government politics, and anti-democratic politics, especially with the health care bill right now in the water. it is just too much for democrats. so you see a number of them saying they would prefer not to be around
people flying into the united states will face tough new security measures. the tsa saying enhanced screening will focus on people flying through countries of interest such as yemen, pakistan and nigeria. the enhanced techniques include full-body patdowns, body scans and thorough searches of carry-on luggage. >>> 2010, as we were saying, good morning to you earlier, it has turned out already fairly deadly for the united states and its allies in afghanistan. nato saying four u.s. service members died in a roadside bomb yesterday. a british soldier was killed in a separate explosion. last year was the bloodiest for coalition forces since the war in afghanistan started. 514 service members died. united states has started deploying 30,000 more troops to fight the taliban. >>> look at this image that we found hanging off a building in former president jimmy carter's hometown of plains, georgia. witnesses told affiliate walb it's an effigy of president obama with a rope around its neck. and one person says it had a sign with the president's name on it. the secret service is now investigat
to the united states. >>> security scare. newark airport locked down for hours after an unknown man slipped past the screening check point. >> as you can see, absolute chaos. >>> and touching the sky. dwarfing the competition, the world's tallest building open for business. this is the cbs morning news for for business. this is the cbs morning news for monday, january 4th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm michelle gielan. this morning the obama administration is instituting new security measures for all passengers flying in to the united states. and passengers from 14 nations will be subject to particularly intense screenings. tara mergener is this washington with details. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. well, these international travelers will be facing new scrutiny now. the tsa calls it a major step forward. starting came, all travelers who want to get into the u.s. will have to play by tough new security rules. but people flying from nations considered to be sponsors of terrorism or other countries of interest will see the biggest changes
on the national mall where the president of the united states, of course, would be taking the oath of office on january 20th and addressing the world with his inaugural address. they took it quite seriously in the last 48 to 72 hours before the inauguration. increasingly they were picking up signs that made them feel like this was a serious and possible threat. they met repeatedly with each other. old team, the bush team, the new team, the obama team, during this transition period in order to figure out what to do about it. it was a moment of quiet tension there for a new president who was just about to take office. >> i understand president obama canceled a rehearsal of the inauguration. when was the president actually briefed? do you know what his reaction was. >> caller: he was kept up to date in the few days leading up to the inauguration. there was one moment in particular we write about in the magazine, the night before the inauguration, his counterterrorism adviser john brennan and a couple foreign policy advisers jump into the limousine with him as he's heading off to an inaugural ev
flying into the united states. that announcement comes amid reports that the u.s. and brin have both shut down their embassies in yemen because of a newly revealed al qaeda threat. brian mooar with that story tonight from capitol hill. >> reporter: beginning at midnight, passengers threeing into the united states from other -- flying into the united states from other country also face tougher random screenings incling fum body scans. travelers from seven high-risk countries including nigeria and yemen, will get full-body pat downs and hands on luggage inspection, the latest fallout from the christmas day bombing a tempt on northwest flight 253, a plot allegedly hatched by al qaeda. >> part of something larger from al qaeda. >> on the sunday talk shows, white house counterterrorism adviser, john brennan add knitted the nation's intelligence agency had but failed to connect the series of dots and insists that the system isn't broken. >> there was no smoking gun or piece of intelligence that said this guy is a terrorist. >> we might have had a partial name or an indication of a nigeria but n
the united states knows pull well that there are two al-queda training camps, major ones in yemen, one in sanaway to the middle of the west of the country, the other in abyan province in the south. we know where they are. we watch them with our satellites but cannot actually launch missile strikes against them because al-queda keeps a lot of civilians around. >> we know of two al-queda camps and there's nothing we can do about them. >> we watch them every hour of every day but there are civilians. it's difficult for us to go in because of the backlash caused if we wiped out hundreds of innocent civilians in that kind of attack. that's why they keep them there. >> you happen to remember the uss cole, right. >> yes. >> and a guy who got help from yemen, presumably organized yemen to blow a plane out of our air and we can't take out their training camp. >> that's an argument a lot of people -- >> welcome to america's nightmare. >> exactly. civilian casualties. have to worry about collateral damage because of the backlash. if you go in, wipe out those training camps, all you do, if you cau
confirmed publicly that the united states would no longer release guantanamo bay prisoners of yemeni doesn't back to their homeland. >> make no mistake, we will fix anything that has damaged our interests and recruit. >> i'll ask a member of the 9/11 commission why so many of their recommendations have gone unheeded. that coming up. >>> moving to afghanistan, the suicide bomber who killed seven cia officers at an american military base. the terrorist was a double agent, and tonight we have new details on how he managed to slip through security. >> this is a jordanian doctor, one former senior u.s. intelligence official says he was providing very important information on some very high-level targets. >> the double agent was brought onto the cia base in afghanistan without first being given a polygraph test, one of the basic tools in establishing a spy's trustworthiness. he had provided bona fide information. a u.s. intelligence official says there was still questions about his reliability and the access he claimed to have through senior al qaeda leaders. >> he had already been to the base a
, japan, britain and the united states shutter their embassies citing terrorist threats. >> u.s. officials tell cnn eight al qaeda suspects were planning to bomb the embassy. we're told yemeni forced killed three and captured one more wearing a suicide vest, but four other suspected terrorists remain at large. >> we see global implications from the war in yemen and the ongoing efforts by al qaeda in yemen. >> we're told that 200 to 300 al qaeda are living in yemen, but when we asked people today about how they feel about al qaeda taking root. >> we hate al qaeda. >> they had all hear that terror suspect umar farouk abdulmutallab studied arabic here. the school's director now believes that abdulmutallab used arabic studies as a cover. >> he was the top in the class. >> officials complain that identifying would-be terrorists among students is nearly impossible here, because the government can't compete with al qaeda. >> we're going to have a whole lot more tonight on the terrorist threat in yemen. we'll bring you a special investigation into the radical cleric hiding out in yemen who could b
to the united states and the obama administration argues by keeping it open it's not only a propaganda tool but a tool that al-qaeda and its various allyies -- although is used to encourage attacks on the united states like the kind on christmas day. the united states says it's committed to closing guantanamo but the timeline is more extended than the president originally hoped. he originally set a january 10 meeting, as the deadline but it's clear it will not be closed before 2011 at the earlier. jon: i know the administration doesn't like the phrase war on terror but if there is a war on terror going on, yemen seems to be the new front, is that right? >> it is a newer front, as far as public perception. the administration would argue it has been focused on yemen since it arrived here, as was the bush administration to a certain degree. david petraeus, head of central command, was on yemen on saturday, john brennan told chris wallace he had been twice this year and yes, the administration is trying to beef up its counterterrorism to the yemeni government. one concession, if the united stat
for an explanation. he has no similarity to bin laden but he doesn't feel safe traveling in the united states. in a statement f.b.i. said the artist wasn't able to find suitable features, features in the updated image came from a photograph they found on the internet. in another case we're watching, the army psychiatrist accused in the shooting rampage should have been red flagged a long time ago. inquiry finds fault with eight supervisors that should have known about the shortcomings and erratic behavior of nidal hasan. they want an effective means to identify. investigators say several mid-level officers failed to look into his work habits and views on religion. officials characterized the shootings as an act of terrorism the first time they used that term. >> julie: thank you very much. all it takes is a text message to help out in haiti. more than half a million people have so far sent ten dollars to the red cross relief efforts. if you would like to support the effort, text the word haiti to this number, 90999. your ten dollars will automatically go to the red cross for disaster relief.
-participation. >> the latino population is the fastest growing in the united states. we'll show you just how fast growing. another part of the census bureau tracking families. some people have forwarding addresses but they know how to track people down with friends and relatives to make sure everyone in the household is counted. >> that isn't comforting to know they know how to track people down. there's a lot of fear in this. >> there's fear among the latino population with the census. you would never answer the door, honestly, and answer these questions. the census bureau working really hard on this marketing campaign which has $100 million of stimulus money in it, by the way, to make sure that people know this is something you have to do. this is important to measure how many people are in this country, where they live, and federal funding, house seats, a lot depends on this. it's all private information. ten minutes, ten questions -- >> may i touch it? >> yes, you may. there are five different languages. john is making fun of me because i'm such a population geek. we'll be able to see how they're mov
of the united states government, but ultimately not analyzed correctly and was not put in a place where this person would have ended up on a no-fly list. the president is angry about that and wants these intelligence and homeland security officials to do better. i think that's the tone we'll hear from the president today. >> savannah, to that point, we just had a heated conversation with a republican strategist who agrees with dick cheney and michael steele saying this administration and the democrats have been soft on terror. might we hear some agregression from the president meeting those critics advising john brennan over the weekend shows? >> reporter: i don't know if he'll take that on in this speech. for everything i've heard about this statement, is that it will be focused really on what happened on christmas day, and not on this larger issue. behind the scenes, the administration's been pretty aggressive pushing back on that criticism by cheney, that somehow they're soft on the war on terror or don't know we're at war, as the former vice president allege. they point out, of cour
and this attack, he said, is also a message to the united states for the cia and to the jordanian intelligence that you can't buy somebody off. you can't buy them away from their fate, because, of course, the jordanian intelligence and the cia thought he was an operative for them. he turned out to have been a double agent, fred dreek kaw. >> what are the implications? video for the cia, for jordanian intelligence agencies, et cetera? >> reporter: we've been talking here with an analyst very familiar with security operations in jordan and throughout the region, and from his perspective, this is going to mean a real close, hard look at all agents, any country is running in that reason, and there are lots of different countries who are running agents in and around the pakistan/afghan border trying to get on, to the al qaeda leaders. everyone will have to look at these spies they're running and figure out if they can trust them. the bottom line here is, trying to track down al qaeda leaders, the analysis has to be, this is going to cause a setback. it's going to take time to reanalyze all of those
? and what might israel do in i'll speak live with the new israeli ambassador here in the united states, michael orrin. >> and explosives are put in a passenger's luggage containment without him knowing. wait until you find out who planted the explosives and why. >>> attention all democrats. there's new reason for political fear. surprise announcements posing more threats to the party's grip on power. (announcer) we understand. you want to grow internationally. >>> jack cafferty is standing by with "the cafferty file." lots of news today. >> indeed. how dare they. democratic leaders have decided to bypass a formal conference committee in order to reconcile the two bills. instead leaders will hold informal -- another word for secret -- negotiations, meant to shut republicans and the public out of the process. what a far cry from the election. when then cant oy 'bama pledged to broadcast health care negotiations on c-span so the american people can see what the choices are, unquote. president obama hasn't even made a token effort to keep his campaign promises of more openness and transpar
for airline passengers coming into the united states from overseas, not every country apparently is onboard with it. some say they have to review the new measures before putting them in effect. nbc's tom aspell joins us now from london. tom, give us more specifics on which countries are wanting to review this and what are their specific concerns? >> airports all over europe stepped up security on flights to the united states. primarily with pat-down body searches. passengers boarding flights in sear yeah, leb zmon libya say there has been no real increase in security. now, airports around the world are considering ways to introduce body scanning machines to check passengers for explosive devices or weapons. there are privacy issues. the machine will somehow have to comply with local laws protecting images of children, for example. one or two countries on the list of 14 nations signaled out for special checks are complaining. saudi arabia and algeria and pakistan all say that it is an insult for their nationals to be on under suspicion. it is unclear what measures the united states will take
day for vice president of the united states. joe biden lost his mother today. she was 92. today, a king would have been 75. fans of elvis presley, the king, gathering at graceland today and around the world to celebrate the late singer's birthday. presley died in 1977 at the young age of 42. the glenn beck program returns in a moment but first bret baier has a preview of what is on "special report." >> hey, uma. coming up, the administration still tries to explain why it did not know al-qaeda in yemen was a real and serious threat. job numbers and how both sides of the aisle are reading them. join me at the top of the hour for "special report." >> oh, what a week we have all just endured. while the democrats were rewriting the federal take-over of healthcare behind closed doors, the public face of the federal government was fixated on denying and then explaining all the gaps in its intelligence gathering. the obama administration has been finger pointing over who in the government let a murderous thug on a plane in amsterdam that he tried to explode over detroit. first, the gove
smaller than the whole united states. this is a big area and there are al qaeda cells springing up in new places. so what do you do about that? >>larry: hoping to do what? >> hoping to, you know, somehow eliminate them, degrade them and defeat them. you know, a giant task. i'm glad it's not mine. >>larry: do you fear them going to do other things in the united states? forget planes, how about shopping centers? ball games? >> exactly. we've talked about this, that you become generals fighting the last war. we're all worried about airline security. you go through an intense scrutiny getting on an airplane, but go on a train or go to a power plant or go to a mall where there are many more people than are on one of these aircraft, and something could happen. now, you can't get on a train in yemen and make it to the united states, so that's a problem for al qaeda, but this is the great question. you can ask the expert. there have been al qaeda cells or al qaeda affiliated individuals in this country operating. >>larry: and watching us tonight now, maybe? >> you know, who knows. that's the prob
. there were 12 firearms found at checkpoints around the united states. they have four instances of artfully conceived -- concealed, prohibited items being found at checkpoints and 24 incidents that involved a checkpoint closure, a terminal evacuation, or what they call a sterile area breach. i think that number is a little higher than normal, jon: jon any tsa problems reported? >> quite a few. in femed the bomb-sniffing dogs failed to test and were taken out of service. bad timing there. they had a scare yesterday at the bakersfield, california airport after a bag tested positive for explosives. no explosive. they opened the bag and found jars containing an amber-colored liquid, the contents of those jars apparently made two tsa officers sick. turned out to be jars of honey. of course we're learning the newark airport near you had problems with a security camera, the delayed response to a security breach. there was a big delay between the time of the breach and the time the terminal was closed down. in just the last few minutes there's an press conference at newark, one senator, bob menende
hatched outside the united states, and then accomplished against the united states. it's the worst attack in the history of this country. so what are we doing? this is a public relations gimmick to try him in a civilian court. >> because the art i get some have made is if he's found guilty, the self-proclaimed mastermind of 9/11, if a civilian court finds him guilty, a criminal court before the whole world watching, he's sentenced to death, and executed, that would be for the world, for america's reputation as a recruiting tool against clade, much better than if a military court were to do the same thing. i see you're smiling, but the argument -- you wouldn't have all the benefits that he would have in a civilian court. >> that's not going to make a darned bit of difference to the terrorists who want to kill us or murder us. it is going to cut off questioning and intelligence as it did on christmas day. finally, all of that will mean nothing, because the president of the united states and the attorney general have very unprecedented way announced he's going to be found guilty. so his conv
, and he was working for them and the united states. it killed seven cia operatives and a jordanian military officer. by all accounts the u.s. and the jordanians thought this man was a trusted agent, because in the past he had given them valuable information that they thought was verified and accurate. but looking at his identity, this man whose name is al-awlaki came from the same place as zarqawi. >> the u.s. must have trusted him because they did not search him at all, and i imagine a lot of that sort of investigation or relationship was built-up even before with the jordanians. i know king abdullah is of course a u.s. ally in the middle east. could this have an impact between the u.s. and jordon? >> the jordanians don't speak about it publicly, but king abdullah and the jordanian government for years helped the united states covertly on the war on terror. they thought the man had information about zawahri, bin laden's number two man. and jordon is a valuable ally to the u.s. this puts king abdullah in a position. he is helping with all of this. but on the other hand he is well t
in yemen-- called al qaeda in the arabian peninsula-- we knew that they sought to strike the united states and that they were recruiting operatives to do so, the intelligence community did not aggressively follow up on and prioritize particular streams of intelligence related to a possible attack against the homeland. second, this contributed to a larger failure of analysis, a failure to connect the dots of intelligence that existed across our intelligence community. third, this in turn fed into shortcomings in the watch- listing system, which resulted in this person not being placed on the no-fly list, thereby allowing him to board that plane in amsterdam for detroit. in sum, the u.s. government had the information scattered throughout the system to potentially uncover this plot and disrupt the attack. rather than a failure to collect or share intelligence, this was a failure to connect and understand the intelligence that we already had. >> holman: as the president spoke, officials released declassified results of the investigation so far. among the new revelations: the 23-year-old niger
, where abdulmutallab is from, and yemen, where he told the united states authorities he was trained by al qaeda operatives. also on the list, iraq, afghanistan, pakistan and saudi arabia. plus, iran, syria, sudan and cuba considered state sponsors of terrorism. chuck shumer said if officials in those countries do not do their part in screening for threats, u.s. carriers should not fly there. >> the terrorists are smart. they know where security is good. they know where security is lax. and of course, they seek the weakest link. >> joining us from washington is nbc's tom costello. tom, let me ask you, have you heard any reaction from the comments made by senator schumer, especially from the airline industry? >> no, not yet. let's keep in mind that the airlines themselves have been pressing for tough security over the years. this is not like the airlines want to go without security. they want tough security. it's their passengers, their crews and their aircraft that are in danger. let's make one point very clear for people. we're talking about these 14 countries. as we mentioned, they inclu
and the reason he brought it to the attention of mr. brennan was because they felt that the united states was not paying enough attention to the country of yemen and the threats there. >> so much about the story that we continue to dissect this morning including how this particular underwear bomber should be tried. should he be an enemy combatant or tried in criminal courts. in criminal courts he is given rights afforded to all of us as u.s. citizens. it was debated with chris wallace on his sunday show. >> let me ask you specifically. after abdulmutallab got lawyered up, did he stop talking? >> i'm not going to address what he did before or after he was -- talked with his lawyer. we got information and we continued to have opportunities to do that. >> why not treat him? you certainly have the right. still have the right to treat him as an enemy combatant. why not do that. if he has more actionable intelligence about future attacks and you say there is a real possibility of that, doesn't the president have the responsibility to do everything legal he can to get that information? >> and th
for the united states and the west. the u.s. government today close its embassy in yemen's capital citing the possibility of terrorist violence. britain has shut down its embassy as well. president obama's assistant for homeland security and counterterrorism explained the decision on cnn's "state of the union." >> i spoke with our ambassador in yemen, ambassador sesh, both this morning as well as last night, and there are indications that al qaeda is planning to carry out an attack against a target inside of sanaa, possibly our embassy, and what we do is to take every measure possible to ensure the safety of our diplomats and citizens abroad. so the decision was made to close the embassy. we're working very closely with the yemeni government on taking the proper security precautions. >> as we've been reporting, u.s. centcom commander general david petraeus was in yemen just yesterday for talks with that country's president. >>> the u.s. embassy is in the capital of sanaa. the ambassador is steven seche, a career foreign service officer who's been with the state department for nearly 30 ye
on purpose. undercover. and you'll see that measures vary from airport to airport in the united states. >> and more of this interview next hour with our jeanne meserve. >>> pakistani intelligence officials now count five u.s. drone attacks over the last week. they're aimed at militants. the pace of the strikes has picked up considerably since a suicide bomber killed seven cia officers in afghanistan. pakistan says the latest drone attack killed at least 13 al qaeda or taliban. >>> the first portrait of princes william and harry together went on display at london's national gallery today. it shows the brothers in formal dress uniform in casual poses. the painting was done in five sittings by the artist nikki phillips. no matter how many layers you put on today, you'll probably need to double it by the weekend. intense wind and bitter windchills have everybody bundling up. we're back in a moment. hey, mayor white. how you doing? great. come on in. would you like to see our new police department? yeah, all right. this way. and here it is. completely networked. so, anything happening, suz?
that al qaeda in yemen was actively recruiting people to attack the united states but those agencies failed to follow through. >> rather than a failure to collect or share gel skwrepbs, this was a failure to connect and understand the intelligence that we already had. >> reporter: the review ordered by the president finds that the u.s. government had sufficient information prior to attempted december 25 attack to have potentially disrupted the al qaeda plot. but when the president met in the oval office to review terrorist threats just three days before the attack, umar farouk abdulmutallab was not even on the list, despite a series of red flags. >> what's new here and what's important and dramatic is the fact that you have an al qaeda affiliate trying to hit the homeland directly. >> reporter: numerous officials, including the president's top homeland security advisors say they share in the blame. >> i told president today i let him down. >> reporter: the head of the national counterterrorism center left for a ski vacation shortly after the attack, meeting with the white house by se
an action against the united states for this unfair treatment, i think remains to be seen. i think what everybody is hoping, including a lot of democrats is this goes away in the conference committee. >> greta: there are a number of state attorney generals who signed on besides yourself. i was liking through the list one of the names isn't on there is the attorney general for the state of nebraska. i assumed he was a democrat. he's a republican. did you call him and ask him what he thought about his state getting this? >> i do know that some of the republican a g's talked to him and i think he's kind of keeping quiet. i think he's also hoping the city going away. i can't imagine anybody wanting to look at the voters of the other states at least, in the eye and say it is okay nebraska gets this deal and rest of us done. but i can't speak for nebraska. >> greta: did you fan democratic ag's to go along with you did you talk to any democratic a g's and what was the response? >> i talked to one off-the-record, if you will. he's hoping that this is going away. they won't have to deal with it
, is not an aspirational terrorist cell but operational one that is a real and lethal threat to the united states. the president described the suspect in the case umar farouk abdulmutallab as a knowner theer r e er t known terrorist. one who never should have been aboard an airliner to the united states. the failure to protect was a problem and the aviation security measures he's strengthening wouldn't had been necessary if the intelligence communitied a done its job and in one respect he addressed how the intelligence community let him and the nation down. take a quick listen. >> we knew they sought to strike the united states and they were recruiting operatives to do so. the intelligence community did not aggressively follow up on and prioritize particular streams of intelligence related to a possible attack against the homeland. >> reporter: in that regard, the central intelligence agency just released a statement saying that the director of the c.i.a. leon panetta ordered that information gathered be disseminated more rapidly within 48 hours on extremist or suspected terrorist and the c.i.a.
happened in the united states. it has happened in europe. but the airport should have been privatized long ago. and they're not. they are still government entities. the air traffic system is still a government entity and they are lagging behind where the deregulated part of the system goes. sure -- >> harry -- thank you. harry, you're in los angeles. if you had to come to new york, you'd probably fly. would you feel safer the city or the county of los angeles operated that airport? or if the airlines that have invested billions in their assets operated that airport and decided who could get on the planes and who couldn't? >> private companies buy far do a much better job at practically everything. in this case, i think the fundamental, though, is we should be attacking them militarily. on offense, not hunkering down in defense and subjecting the citizens to being treated like cattle. >> i want to get into the $160 billion borrowing. >> let me go straight to it. >> next week the government is planning to make the largest acquisition in the debt market that it's ever made. it is going to go
the united states embassy has been closed for security reasons and the british embassy closed as well. what can you tell us about the intelligence? >> looked at the intelligence that's available as far as the plans for al qaeda to carry out attacks possibly defense our embassy, possibly against u.s. personnel. decided it was the prudent thing to do to shut the embassy. we're working very closely with the yemeni authorities to address the threat that's out there. again it just demonstrates that al qaeda is determined to carry out these attacks and we're determined to thwart these attacks. >> there's a live threat, there's an active threat? >> there is. al qaeda has several hundred members in yemen and they've grown in strength. that's why from the first day of this administration we've focud on yemen. i've traveled out to yemen twice to talk to the president. in fact, this past week. we're continuing this dialogue. we've provided equipment training, we're cooperating very closely. >> there's a report that the british and the united states are now setting up counterterrorism police force in y
they were talking about sending mr. abdulmutallab to the united states. >> reporter: the report concludes it was not information sharing among agencies, but more systemic. a failure of analysis, connecting the dots, and now in hindsight, a failure to follow up on the lead that al qaeda in yemen wanted to strike the u.s. on the homeland. >> we must follow the leads that we get, and we must pursue them until plots are disrupted. that means assigning clear lines of responsibility. >> reporter: the president issued 16 new reforms he wants implemented at key agencies including state, review how u.s. visas are issued and revoked. homeland security. pursue new technologies and procedures for screening airline passengers. cia. strengthen procedures on terrorist watch lists in review and distribution. fbi, conduct a full review of the terrorist-screening data base. a senior state department official tells nbc news a simple misspelling of abdulmutallab's name is why no one knew he had a valid visa. >> the president is investing a billion more dollars in aviation security around the world. he said w
the bottom line on this, john. as you know, senator chris dodd has made the united states senate his life. he's been in the senate for three decades, but he has had a series of very, very tough political battles. in connecticut, starting with the fact that he moved to iowa to run for president with his wife and his two small children, that's when connecticut voters started to turn on him, then the fact that he is the senate banking chairman and obviously wall street went south. there's been a lot of attention paid to the fact that he has close ties with the banking community. so all of those things, combined with the fact that it is just not a good potential year for democrats, made senator dodd decide finally to retire and not run again. >> so what does this mean for democrats in terms of their chances in the 2010 election? do they have a good solid candidate who could replace dodd? and what does it mean for the president's agenda? >> reporter: that's a good question. when it comes to connecticut, you would think that this would be a bad sign for democrats. but actually, because senator dodd
. and mark and lynn, thank you very much. increasingly there is a concern for the united states and the west. >>> the u.s. government closed the embassy siting the possibility of terrorist violence. president obama is insistent for homeland security and counterterrorism. >> i spoke with the ambassador and both this morning as well as last night, there are indications that al qaeda is planning to carry out attacks against suddam. and what we do is take every measure possible to ensure the safety of our diplomats and citizens abroad. the decision was made to work closely on taking precautions. >> as we've been reporting, general david petraeus was in yemen yesterday with talks. the u.s. embassy, the ambassador, a career for are ren service officer been with the state department for nearly 30 years. the sneeds for u.s. citizens is vees sas and passports. and let's talk about these national security measures. during this debate, the obama administration, again, criticized very strongly. where do they stand as far as accountability here? did they drop the ball here? >> it's just like going back t
like fetchin wasally. >> the president of the united states, after a two-hour meeting -- >> i'm not sure that's english, but we will go with it. >> well, it means talking. after two hours of talking with the intelligence and security officials in this country, the president centralled to the lectern in the white house and said we had enough information. we could have stopped it. we screwed up. listen to this. >> the bottom line is this. the u.s. government had sufficient information to have uncovered this plot and potentially disrupt the christmas day attack. but our intelligence community failed to connect those dots, which would have placed the suspect on the no-fly list. in other words, this was not a failure to collect intelligence, it was a failure to integrate and understands the intelligence that we already had. >> essentially the same problem we had lead to go 9/11 and other things butch the president looked like he was in control. he evidently, by all reports, was extremely ticked off. there was a report when it was time to have a second address over in hawaii, that t
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